November 2014


When our dogs are in hunter mode, I try to look away, but I couldn’t ignore our youngest, Missy, when she was victorious and pranced around with her prey today. Was it a native bird or just a sparrow?

I couldn’t tell which, but from her chomping into it, it must have been tasty, to her at least. I’m ameat-eater too, and I know, with the pharaoh hounds especially, hunting is in their bones. They go outside, they look for things to chase and eat. I can’t stop that instinct – they’re certainly fed enough that they don’t need to catch their own.

If I ever actually became a vegetarian, I still wouldn’t try to stop them fromĀ eating birds and other creatures, no matter how much I wished they wouldn’t do it. The dogs are limited to just the back yard, and the dog run. This is only a small part of what we have …

It’s a small thing, knowing the other creatures have places to go, still on our property, but away from the dogs. I know that, the dogs know that, but the creatures don’t realise it. One day, when I’m old, perhaps we’ll only have small dogs, ones that don’t have overwhelming desires to catch and kill.

I like the pharaoh hounds though. They’re quite different from the schnauzer, the breed I’ve been involved in for nearly thirty years. A schnauzer can kill creatures too, but they’re not as intent on doing it, the way the hounds are. The two breeds were both created to do different things.

The schnauzer was bred as a general farm dog, helping farmers around the place, herding, guarding and so on. The pharaoh hound has been a helper for farmers too, but their role was to keep down the rabbit numbers. So sitting around and chasing and killing rabbits has been their role for many hundreds of years.

Our dogs can’t get at the rabbits around the place, the creatures don’t come over the dog’s side of the fence. So the birds, lizards and snakes, if they come too close, are chased and caught, and eaten, or at least attacked, sometimes. The snakes frighten me. They’re brown snakes, and yes, our dogs have tussled with them.

Most recently, one of our dogs, Missy, was bitten by one of these killer snakes. She was seen in time, and my son and I raced her to the vet, where her life was saved. It was expensive, but I’m glad she’s back with us, still racing around looking for things to catch, whenever she goes outside. It was expensive, but with her being our youngest dog, I’m glad she’s still with us.

Do you have dogs? Do they have any habits that you’d rather they didn’t have?

When I am at home, I rarely eat dessert. We rarely eat dessert, except for the menfolk having some icecream as needed on hotter days, and sometimes after our evening meal we may have a small amount of chocolate, for health reasons only, of course. But perhaps because of this ‘no dessert’ thing of mine, I have to admit that I often launch out and order dessert when I dine out. My weight is well within the ‘ideal range’ for my height, and I am not a big eater, and that’s how I keep my weight that way.

I was at an event in Gawler today, a launch of a lovely new calendar featuring beautiful and tasteful photos of lovely ladies who have MS, and who weren’t wearing many clothes. All very nice, and no salacious pics, but a bit of naughty fun! Calendars can be obtained from here, if anyone is interested.

Anyway, after the fun of getting myself a calendar, and having it signed by the photographed ladies who were present, I decided I deserved some lunch. I know fruit and nuts are important, so I checked out the menu and ordered a serve of black forest cake. It came with (glace) cherries, sliced thin almonds and two small strawberries. I ate it all up, and enjoyed it very much!

I suspect it might be a good idea to actually jump on the scales again soon – I don’t want to end up overweight again, and if I keep up with this dining out and ordering dessert lifestyle (with little exercise), the overweight might creep up on me!

Having four dogs in the house, and being the only human in the house at the moment, might well result in me having to venture outside soon, and so some walking around and picking up and disposing of duties. Not my favourite canine chore, but dog owners must be pooper scoopers too, at times … Judging by the odour in the room, that task might be needed soonish. Phew! Smelly farts, or is that a precursor?

I’d better get out in the garden with the dogs!

I am currently at my ideal weight for my height, and have been there for quite some time. This in spite of eating sweet things not low calorie things when I dine out, and eating chocolate at home quite often. I haven’t been doing much exercise lately, but my weight is still good – 50kg and and I’m five foot nothing.

What is my secret, I hear you ask? Not so quickly … I have several medical reasons why I want to keep my weight down, and which are important to consider re exercise. I have a bung-ish knee, I have the chronic illness multiple sclerosis. The knee isn’t too painful, but keeping my weight where it’s best suited is good for it, and if I exercise to vigorously, it hurts my knee. The multiple sclerosis means keeping active is both good for me, and potentially impacted, in terms of balance and fatigue.

I’ve discovered an easy exercise program that suits me well enough, but at the moment I seem to have fallen into a ‘don’t feel like it’ period. I think if the desserts and sweet things start showing up with my weight, I’ll have the incentive to get back exercising.

Anyway, back to the point – How did I lose my weight (10kg over a couple of years), and keep it off? It’s not a wonder drug, or a fancy machine. The secret to my weight loss win is simple mathematics. When you use up more calories than you consume, you will lose weight. It may take a while to kick in, and it may not bring weight loss quickly, but if you continue to watch what you eat, and eat enough of the good stuff but not too much, you too can get to your ideal weight.

I would recommend a visit to a dietician to talk about your plans, but just learning to be more mindful with your eating, you’ll realise where you may have been going wrong. I used to eat all of the food on my plate, and would sometimes not eat enough fruit and vegetables. I’ve got better at it all now, and I’m finding that a few months of fasting several times a week helped me to learn what actual hunger feels like.

I learned to ignore my head, and listen to my body, regarding hunger. The average person can easily go on a reduced amount of food every now and then. I know I did, and I’m showing the good results from it!